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Full text of "North Carolina tobacco report [serial]"

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OBACCC^RSt0RT 



t960-t: 




THE BULLETIN 

of the 
North CaroSina Department of Agriculture 

L. Y. Ballentine, Commissioner 



.Number 163 



Morch, 1961 



FOREWORD 

This twelfth annual issue of the Tobacco Report has 
been compiled and prepared by W. P. Hedrick and J. 
H. Cyrus, tobacco specialists with the Division of Mar- 
kets of the North Carolina Department of Agriculture, 
in cooperation with the U. S. Department of Agricul- 
ture under the Research and Marketing Act. 

Credit is due the Cooperative Crop Reporting 
Service of the North Carolina and United States De- 
partments of Agriculture, and the Tobacco Branch of 
the USDA Agricultural Marketing Service for much 
of the statistical data contained herein. 

This issue of the Tobacco Report is dedicated to 
agricultural engineering researchers for their efforts 
toward mechanizing the handling of tobacco and re- 
ducing the man hours necessary to produce this 
expensive crop. 




ComTYiissioner of Agriculture 



For free distribution by the Tobacco Section, 
Markets Division, North Carolina Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, Raleigh, N. C. 



4/61— 6M 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 
The Flue-Cured Outlook, 1961 4 

The Burley Tobacco Outlook, 1961 9 

International Trade In Flue-Cured Tobacco.. 10 

State Summary, 1960-61 14 

North Carolina Tobacco Warehouse Sales Report, 1960-61 .16 

Summary of Dealer and Warehouse Resales, 1960-61 18 

Producer and Gross Sales of Flue-Cured Tobacco By States, 1960 18 

Stabilization Receipts by Belts— 1960 18 

Flue-Cured Movement In and Out of North Carolina 19 

Burley Movement In and Out of North Carolina 19 

North Carolina Flue-Cured Crops, 1919-1960 20 

North Carolina Burley Crops, 1928-1960 21 

North Carolina Flue-Cured Tobacco Allotments, 1961 22 

North Carolina Burley Tobacco Allotments, 1961 24 

North Carolina Tobacco Warehouses and Operators 

By Belts and Markets 25 

Domestic Cigarette Consumption By Kinds, 1960 Back Cover 



Our cover picture is a Japanese field of flue-cured tobacco with curing 
lam in the background. 



Flue-Cured Outlook 1961 

Can North Carolina tobacco growers repeat in 1961 the suc- 
cessful season they enjoyed in 1960? Last season was one of the 
best on record in average yield per acre, total produced on acre- 
age allotted, quality of leaf and average price received. 

In spite of a late transplanting season growers produced a 
yield of 1,820 pounds per acre, a total poundage of 834 million, 
and received 510 million dollars for an average of $61.20 per 
hundred pounds. 

The outlook for 1961 indicates that the factors affecting 
future prospects are just as good for this season as they were 
last year or better, vs^ith one possible exception, the weather. 
Seldom do you have two ideal growing seasons successively. 

As for domestic buyer demand, cigarette consumption set 
new high records in 1960 and are expected to go higher in 1961. 
Cigarettes manufactured and put into trade channels totaled 
510 billion during the year, an increase of 21 billion over 1959. 
The 1960 production of smoking tobacco for pipes and "roll- 
your-own" cigarettes shows a slight increase over 1959, cur- 
rently estimated at about 74 million pounds. 

The only other tobacco product using flue-cured tobacco in 
quantity is chewing tobacco and this type of product no longer 
appears to fit in with present day living and employment. The 
downward trend in usage is likely to continue in 1961 and future 
years. However, much of this loss will be taken up by 
cigarettes. 

During 1960 domestic manufacturers used 796 million pounds 
of flue-cured and this figure is expected to show a further mod- 
erate increase. Exports of flue-cured are expected to regain 
the loss from a slight dip in 1959 and return to the 440 to 450 
million pound level of the past five years. The increase in exports 
from the 1960 crop can be attributed to the better-than-average 
quality of the crop produced and export dealers and manufac- 
turers increased their purchases substantially. 

On November 23, the acreage allotment for the 1961 crop was 
set by the U. S. Department of Agriculture at 470,000 acres for 
North Carolina. For the majority of farms the 1961 allotment 
will be the same as last year. 



I 




Mechanical harvester priming Eeaves in field and bulking tobacco for curing 
in bulk curing barns. 



Under the stabilized price support passed by Congress in 1959, 
the support level will be the same as last year adjusted in pro- 
portion to the change between the 1959 parity index and the 
average of the parity index for the three prior years. As of 
January 1, indications are that the 1961 price support level will 
be the same as the 55.5 cents per pound level of last year. 



Total Supplies 

Growers will enter the 1961 season with a carryover of flue- 
cured stocks amounting to 2,120 million pounds — slightly above 
mid-1960. As the allotted acreage is practically the same as last 
year, little change from last year's harvested acreage is ex- 
pected. However, weather conditions last season were ideally 
suited for high yield, and it can hardly be expected that these 
conditions will prevail two years in a row. If the yields per acre 
should equal the average for the last three years. North Caro- 
lina growers would produce 778 million pounds or 56 million 
pounds less than in 1960, while the national crop of flue-cured 



would total 1,170 million pounds. 

This would mean a total supply of 3,290 million pounds or 
stocks for 2.7 years. This supply is only slightly above the 
amount considered normal. 

On January 1, Stabilization held stocks from six crops, 1955 
to 1960 inclusive. The total amounted to 539 million pounds, or 
22 million pounds less than a year earlier. During the year 
Stabilization sold 74 million pounds. This was considerably 
less than the amount sold the previous year, but still indicate^ 
that stocks held by Stabilization are headed in the right direction. 

Tar Heel tobacco growers can take heart from the fact that 
President Kennedy, both before and after the election, endorsed 
the tobacco program. The President called it "the one bright 
spot" in the agricultural picture. He agreed that it is fair to 
the grower, consumer and government, and has cost the tax- 
payer practically nothing. The new Secretary of Agriculture, 
Orville Freeman, says he would "certainly expect to maintain" 
the present tobacco price support program. 

Quotas are subject to referendum at three-year intervals. 
Growers approved the quota program for the 1959, 1960 and 
1961 crops in a referendum held in December, 1958. Sometime 




A rack of tobacco prepared for bulk curing. This method does away with 
tobacco sticks and stringing. 




Bulk Curing Barn 



this fall flue-cured growers will vote again on continuation of 
quotas for the next three years. 

Although tobacco growers are in fairly good condition at 
present, what about the years ahead ? The future profitable pro- 
duction of tobacco is tied in closely with the amount of mechan- 
ization that can be developed to eliminate much of the handwork 
necessary at present. Mechanization is urgently needed. Re- 
search shows that it now takes from 300 to 400 man-hours to 
produce an acre of tobacco. There has been little improvement 
in this aspect of tobacco production in the past 100 years, and 
tobacco takes more man-hours than any other field crop. 

Hiring field labor is becoming increasingly difficult and ex- 
pensive for the farmer. Manpower is leaving the farms for 
industry in the urban centers. Labor, when available, demands 
pay equal to that of factory workers. 

In spite of high prices received for the 1960 crop, tobacco 
farming is not as profitable as it seems at first glance. As time 
goes along it is evident that future profits will depend on the 
development of labor-saving devices. At present research is 
being done at several colleges to mechanize the handling of 
tobacco, in planting, harvesting and curing. Progress is being 



t 



made in all directions. 

A seed planter is being developed at the University of Ken- 
tucky that is intended to do away with the necessity of seed beds 
and transplanting. Tobacco seed will be rolled into small pellets 
of clay, dropped from a hopper into holes punched into a plastic 
strip that spreads across the field as the planter moves along. 

In development are mechanical harvesters that prime leaves 
from the stalk, and of course the bulk curer that was in farm use 
during last season. 

These and many other labor savings problems are being 
studied. The answers will not come this year or next. Eventual- 
ly, however, the tobacco grower's cost must be reduced if he 
expects to continue to lead in income received from North Caro- 
lina's agriculture. 

The necessity for cost reduction is two-fold. First, to widen 
the profit margin to the grower and second to hold at present 
prices the cost of tobacco to foreign buyers. 

Until recent years North Carolina's leaf growers had no com- 
petition at home and a minimum of export competition from 
foreign-grown leaf. Conditions are different today. Canada's 
1960 flue-cured crop was 191 million pounds and averaged $57 
per hundred pounds ; Rhodesia produced a crop of 222 million 
pounds that sold for $40 per hundred pounds ; and India's 1960 
crop of flue-cured is estimated at 139 million pounds and is sell- 
ing for $35 per hundred pounds. 

American flue-cured meets competition in world markets from 
tobacco produced in all these countries. 

If mechanization should come first to these large producing 
competitors of ours. North Carolina growers would probably lose 
what we have left of our export trade. At present, North Caro- 
lina leaf tobacco, like other farm commodities, faces a substitu- 
tion problem in foreign markets as prices go up. 

There has been more change in agricultural production on the 
farm in the past 50 years in all crops except tobacco, than there 
was in the previous 1,000 years. 

The only improvements tobacco has benefited from are improv- 
ed varieties, higher yields per acre, insect control and disease 
reduction. Tobacco is far behind other crops in this respect, 
and we must catch up if tobacco is to remain King of North 
Carolina's agriculture. 



I 



Burley Outlook 1961 

North Carolina burley growers enjoyed a very successful sea- 
son in 1960. While production was down from 1959 the price of 
$65.00 per hundred was the highest in history, and the 
total money received was the second largest amount, $12.5 mil- 
lion dollars. 

On January 30, the Secretary of Agriculture announced a six 
percent increase in acreage for 1961. The effect of this increase 
in North Carolina will be small, as most of our 18,000 growers 
have allotments of six-tenths of an acre or less. 

The total supply of burley is 1,687 million pounds or 39 mil- 
lion lower than was available for 1960. During the past five 
years burley stocks have been reduced 156 million pounds. In 
the past year government loan stocks of burley declined sharply 
as substantial quantities were sold and moved into trade chan- 
nels. On January 1, less than 80 million pounds remained in 
the government pool. 

The same factors that affect the disappearance of flue-cured 
affect burley — consumption of cigarettes, smoking and chewing 
tobacco and snuff. The use of burley for the manufacture of 
these products increased 16 million pounds during 1960, and the 
increase is expected to continue for the years ahead. 

Exports of burley remain at about the 36 million pound level, 
but there are some prospects of increase if larger supplies are 
available at a price in line with other types of tobacco. 

More burley continues to be produced in foreign countries. 
During the period 1947-51 production of burley in foreign areas 
averaged only 36 million pounds annually. At present produc- 
tion has reached 116 million pounds. 



International Trade In Flue-Cured 
Tobacco 

By W. P. Hedrick, Tobacco Marketing Specialist 
N. C. Department of Agriculture 

Tobacco has been an important commodity in international 
trade for more than 350 years, beginning on a commercial scale 
with the English Colony at Jamestown in the early 1600's. The 
increase in world trade of tobacco since World War I has been 
gradual. However, since World War II there have been pro- 
nounced increases in producing areas and shifts in markets as 
to types of tobacco entering world trade. 

Over 100 years ago, in the year 1856, an accident in curing 
tobacco on a farm in Caswell County was responsible for the 
beginning of flue-cured tobacco. Today, flue-cured tobacco is 
being grown in many countries around the world. 

For many years following 1856, the United States was the 
only producer of flue-cured tobacco, and it was not until the 
early 1900's that any noticeable amounts of flue-cured tobacco 
were grown in foreign countries. During the 1920's the United 
States was producing about 90 percent of the world's produc- 
tion, but during the middle 1930's the U. S. production dropped 
to about two-thirds of world production. 

From the mid 1930's until around 1950 the United States 
increased its production at about the same rate as foreign coun- 
tries. Therefore, the U. S. maintained about two-thirds of 
world production during those years. However, since 1950 world 
production has increased at a faster rate than the United States, 
and today the American grower is producing only about 40 per- 
cent of the total flue-cured raised in the world. 

A record world crop of flue-cured was produced in 1960, a 
total of 3,265 million pounds. Production was up in the United 
States as w^ell as in other major tobacco growing countries, with 
particularly big gains in Rhodesia, Canada and India. 

The U. S. 1960 crop of flue-cured was 1,250 million pounds. 
Other free world countries also had large flue-cured crops. 
Rhodesia's record harvest was 222 million pounds. Flue-cured 
production in Canada was a record 191 million pounds, while 

10 




Domestic and foreign buyers inspecting and appraising new varieties for quality 
and buyer acceptability before release of seed to growers for production. 



India's flue-cured crop was only slightly larger than the pre- 
vious year. 

The production of flue-cured tobacco — the most important 
kind entering world trade — continues to be encouraged in Com- 
monwealth countries by the preferential tariff in the United 
Kingdom. The guaranteed purchase agreement between British 
manufacturers and Rhodesian growers also acts as a stimulant 
to production. 

The U. S. flue-cured tobacco farmer, who is depending upon 
the domestic market as well as export trade for sound economic 
backing, has seen some changes come over the market during 
the last few years. 

This is especially true in the domestic market where con- 
sumer preference for filter-tip cigarettes caused a shift in com- 
pany buying patterns, from the thinner, milder grades to 
heavier, more aromatic grades. This change in buying pattern 

11 



puts domestic buyers in direct competition with export buyers 
which has caused a sharp increase in price on some of the 
export grades. 

Therefore, foreign production continues to be stimulated by 
the relatively high prices of U. S. cigarette tobacco, particularly 
low and medium grades. U. S. prices are higher than for similar 
tobacco grown in major competing countries, especially Rhodesia. 

In recent years some U. S. tobacco growers have tended to 
emphasize production of pounds at the expense of quality. At 
the same time effective research, improved varieties and better 
sorting practices have improved competitive tobaccos. Heavier 
demands for them have resulted. 

American manufacturers are providing an ever-increasing 
market for imported cigarette tobacco. So far the principal im- 
ports have been turkish tobacco, for blending purposes, from 
Greece and Turkey. These imports have increased in the past 
few years from 80 to 110 million pounds, and manufacturers 
seem to be taking advantage of reduced U. S. tariffs to move 
more and more tobacco here. The import tariffs have been 
reduced in the past few years from 35 cents per pound to .1275 
cents per pound. This is one point American growers should 
watch closely. While we have been reducing tariffs, other coun- 
tries have been throwing up artificial barriers to important 
markets that will affect export trade in the years ahead and will 
encourage gains in trade by our competitors. Licensing of to- 
bacco bought with dollars remains in effect in many countries. 
Regulations requiring the mixing of native tobacco with import- 
ed U. S. leaf are in effect in West Germany, Australia and New 
Zealand. 

The formation of the European Economic Community already 
has affected the demand for U. S. tobacco in the six-member 
countries : West Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, France, Italy 
and Luxembourg. These countries proposed to establish a 30 
percent ad valorem rate on all tobacco imported from countries 
outside the Common Market area. 

Recently, members of the Common Market area agreed to an 
adjustment in this rate. Negotiations are underway at present 
to work out this problem. 

Western Europe, taken as a whole, continues to be the major 
miarket area for our leaf tobacco exports. The United Kingdom 
is the No. 1 buyer of American leaf. However, since 1951, U. S. 
leaf exports to the United Kingdom have dropped from 220 mil- 



12 



^ 



lion pounds to about 140 million a year. Rhodesian exports to 
the United Kingdom have increased at about the same rate as 
our decline. United Kingdom buyers take the top quality grades 
from the Rhodesian crop and pay prices well above the average 
of the entire crop. On the other hand, prices they pay for tobacco 
bought in this country are more in line w^ith the prices paid for 
the entire crop. One of the reasons for this is that the Rhodesian 
tobacco enjoys a preferential import duty rate of 21 cents a 
pound into the United Kingdom. 

West Germany has shown an increase in the imports of United 
States leaf in the past few years, as well as Denmark and Sweden, 
while decreases have occurred in the Netherlands, Belgium and 
Ireland. 

The situation in tobacco going to Australia is somewhat sim- 
ilar to Western Europe. Australia has a mixing law requiring 
cigarettes manufactured there to contain a certain percentage 
of Australian tobacco. Australia has increased its imports for 
the last few years, but most of the increase has gone to Rhodesia, 
rather than the United States. 

In view of the fact that cigarettes are increasing in popularity 
throughout the world, the American flue-cured grower, and par- 
ticularly the North Carolina grower should share in the increased 
consumption of tobacco. Favorable business conditions, more 
extensive advertising, larger incomes and greater contact among 
people throughout the world will likely assure a continued upward 
trend in cigarette manufacture. Many new cigarette factories 
have been built during the last decade in underdeveloped coun- 
tries. 

There are several favorable factors that point up the fact that 
North Carolina's tobacco economy can share in tobacco's ex- 
panding future. 

Stocks of U. S. flue-cured leaf are lower in many important 
markets than a year ago; the United Kingdom has removed 
financial restrictions on purchases of U. S. flue-cured; gold and 
dollar reserves abroad are large and economic ^activity continues 
strong ; world cigarette consumption is moving upward at about 
five percent yearly; the 1960 crop of flue-cured was one of the 
best export quality ^crops in yea,js ; and the support price has been 
stabilized by legislatioji enacted in early 1960. 

Our flue-cured growers have the responsibility' to continue to 
produce quality tobacco, plant only recommended and tested 
varieties, use recommended cultural practices and allow tobacco 
to ripen;, ijij;hup, field before harvesting. ; -;> ■ ■. - Ho^r;- ,:. 



State Summary 1960-61 

North Carolina flue-cured tobacco growers made several new records during 
the 1960 season. First, they received the highest average price ever paid for 
flue-cured tobacco in the state. Secondly, they produced the most pounds 
per acre ever made in North Carolina, and the dollar value per acre was the 
highest on record. The yield was 1,820 pounds per acre and the previous 
high yield was 1,718 pounds in 1958. Burley growers also set a new record 
average price in North Carolina of $65.25 per hundred during the 1960-61 
marketing season. 

The North Carolina flue-cured markets sold 817,386,008 pounds of tobacco 
for growers during the 1960 season, for a cash return of $500,109,487, which 
was a record season average of $61.18 per hundred. In 1959, producer sales 
in North Carolina showed an average of $58.29 per hundred for 683,004,915 
pounds of tobacco, which returned the growers $398,121,773. This compari- 
son shows that flue-cured tobacco growers fared much better in 1960 with 
an increase in price of $2.89 per hundred, and a poundage increase of 134,- 
381,093 pounds which gave them an increase in cash returns of $101,987,714 
over the previous year. 

The value of the 1960 flue-cured crop in North Carolina was the third 
highest on record, exceeded only by the 1951 and 1955 crops. 

Type 13 — North Carolina Border Markets opened for the 19 30 market- 
ing season on August 11, which was two weeks later than the 1959 opening. 
The quality of the crop was not as good as the previous year. The drop in 
quality was due mostly to a late growing season and heavy rains from a 
liurricane late in July. There was a noticeable decrease in choice and fine 
grades, and an increase in low and poor qualities. However, the average 
prices for about 50 percent of the grades were $1 to $5 per hundred higher 
than the previous year. About 20 percent of the grades showed losses of 
$1 to $2, which were mostly variegated leaf, red leaf and low lug grades. 
The other 30 percent of the grades were unchanged. 

The volume of producer sales was up in 1960 to 150,575,437 pounds, which 
Ijoosted the value of sales to $93,648,182. However, the market average of 
$62.13 was a slight decline from the previous year's record of $62.37 per 
hundred. Growers received $82,374,446 in 1959 for 132,082,333 pounds of 
tobacco sold on North Carolina border markets. 

The season ended in this belt on October 14, covering a period of 46 sale 
days. Last year the season covered 42 selling days. 

Type 12 — The 19 60 marketing season opened in the Eastern Belt on 
August 23, which was about a week later than the 1959 opening. The quality 
of offerings in this belt showed some improvement over the previous year. 
The percentage of cutters increased and there were more good quality grades, 
and less poor quality and nondescript grades. About 47 percent of the grades 
offered showed a decrease of $1 to $4 per hundred in average, about 36 percent 
were up $2 to $4, and 17 percent showed no change compared with the 1959 
season. 

The general market average in the Eastern Belt set a record of $61.24 per 
hundred for 409,980,457 pounds of tobacco sold for producers during the 



14 



I 



season, which returned them $251,077,871. Thus, the 1960 crop showed an 
increase in general average price, total value, and volume as compared to 
1959 when growers averaged $58.70 per hundred for 328,378,308 pounds 
which sold for $192,736,686. 

The Eastern Belt completed its 1960 season on November 4 after operating 
for 53 sale days. In 1959 the markets in this belt operated for 57 days. 

Type UB — The Middle Belt markets opened on September 6, 1960, 
which was one week later than in 1959. There was considerable improve- 
ment in the quality of tobacco offered for sale during the 1960 season. The 
percentage of low to good quality grades increased, and the amount of poor 
quality and nondescript offered was substantially less than the previous 
year. Practically all of the medium to low grades showed an increase in 
price over last year, ranging from $1 to $11 per hundred. 

Growers in this belt received a record high average of $61.61 this season 
for 154,414,952 pounds of tobacco, which pushed the value of the sales to 
$95,128,920. This is considerably more than the $57.17 per hundred that 
growers received in 1959 for 122,899,800 pounds, which returned them only 
$70,265,617. 

The final sales in this belt were held on November 18, which covered 53 
sale days. This is two days less than the 1959 season. 

Type llA — The 1960 selling season started on North Carolina Old Belt 
markets on September 19, about one week later than the 1959 opening. The 
quality of the tobacco sold was much better than the previous year. There 
were more good and fine quality grades and less nondescript, and there was 
a larger percentage of cutters and smoking leaf. About 75 percent of the 
grades offered for sale showed increases in price ranging from $1 to $9 com- 
pared with 1959. There was no change in about 15 percent of the grades, 
and about 10 percent were lower than the previous year. Losses occurred 
chiefly in the heavier leaf grades. 

Farmers selling on the nine North Carolina Old Belt markets received a 
record high season average of $58.83 for 102,415,172 pounds of tobacco, giving 
them a cash return of $60,254,514. In 1959 these growers received $52,745,- 
024 from 99,644,474 pounds of tobacco, which averaged only $52.93 per 
hundred. 

Final sales were held in this belt on December 14, covering a period of 
60 sale days. In 1959 the season lasted for 63 days. 

Type 31 — The three North Carolina hurley markets at Asheville, Boone 
and West Jefferson opened for the 1960-61 marketing season on November 28. 

The general quality of offerings was considerably better than in the pre- 
vious year, with a larger percentage of the crop going into the thinner 
smoking quality grades. Only about one percent of the sales went into the 
hurley pool under government loan. 

Burley growers selling on North Carolina markets during the 1960-61 
season received a new record high average of $65.25 per hundred for 
15,724,586 pounds, returning them $10,260,172. During the 1959-60 market- 
ing season, growers averaged only $56.62 per hundred for 17,724,068 pounds, 
which returned them $10,035,703. 

Final sales were held at Asheville and Boone on January 11, and West 
Jefferson rounded out a season of 25 sale days on January 12, 1961. The 
previous season covered 23 selling days. 

15 



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Summary of N. C. Dealer and Warehouse 
Resales— 1960-61 

Belt Pounds 

Border Belt 

Dealer 4,667,924 

Wareliouse 10,187,264 

Eastern Belt 

It^aler 10,239,056 

Wareliouse 23,630,370 

Middle Belt 

Dealer 4,865,694 

Warehouse 10,869,210 

Old Belt 

Dealer 3,457,872 

Warehouse 10,790,780 

Burley Belt 

Dealer 363,036 

Warehouse 1,521,508 



Producer and Gross Sales of Flue Cured 
Tobacco by States — 1960 



Dollars 


Percentage 
Resales 


$ 2,277,656 
5,789,934 


2.8 
6.1 


4,930,560 
13,226,240 


2.3 
5.3 


2,315,400 
6,249,663 


2.8 
6.4 


1,602,220 
6,144,845 


3.0 

9.2 


219,888 
951,610 


2.1 
8.6 







Prod 


ucer Sales 


Gross 


Sales 


State 


Pounds 


Average Price 


Pounds 


Average Price 


X. <\ 
Va. 
S. ('. 
Oa. 




817,386,018 

134,560,552 

129,239,677 

148,037,092 


61.18 
59.16 
61.98 
56.80 
60.47 

60.47 


896,094,188 
145,536,017 
145,292,803 
160,696,713 
21,583,531 


60.24 
58.70 
61.27 
56 44 


Fla. 




19,077,730 


56 57 




Total 








1,248,301,069 


1,369,203,252 


59.89 



Stabilization Receipts By Belts— 1960 



Beh 


Type 


Producers 
Sales (lbs.) 


Stabilization 
Receipts (lbs.) 


Percentage 
Stab. Received 


Old Belt 

M.ddle Belt 

Kastern Belt 

Border Belt 

Ga.-Fla. Belt 


UA 

ii:b 

12 

13 

14 


236,975,724 
154,414,952 
409,980,457 
279,815,114 
167,114,822 

1,248,301,069 


16,194,854 
5,314,876 

19,044,484 
8,892,042 
2,314,716 




6.79 
3.44 
4.64 
3.18 
1.38 


Total 


11-14 


51,760,972 


4.14 



Flue Cured Movement In and Out of 
North Carolina 

N. C. Tobacco Sold Out of State Out of State Tobacco Sold in N. C. 



State I960 1959 I960 1959 

Va 32,787,230 2,S,33ri,0,S3 10,7l)l,ti03 9,875,082 

S. C 9,094.44i 7.431,42-' 11,070,877 14.782,864 

Ga 4,771,89.-, 8,9'3,S.-1 14.792 

Fla 1.392 20,480 



Ala 1,228 1,316 



Total 46,6.54,959 44,713,842 24,773,708 24,674,054 

Burley Tobacco Movement In and Out of 
North Carolina 





N.C. Tobacco 


Sold Out of State 


Out 


of State Tobacco Sold in N. C. 


State 


I960 


1959 




I960 


1959 


Tenn. . 


4,990,582 


.-.,134,613 

.■5,788 




1,204,362 

1,415,983 

17,574 

23,568 
1,938 

2,663,425 


1,516,994 


Va. 


6,890 


1,399,065 


W. Va 




22,950 


Ky. 


8,151 




Ga 




23,924 


S. C 






Total 


5,005,629 


5,140,401 


2,962,933 



19 



North Carolina Flue-Cured Crops 
1919-1960* 







Yield Per 








Year " 


No. Acres 


Acre 


Production 


Valiie 


Average 






(Pounds) 


(1,000 lbs.) 


(1,000 Dollars) 


Price 


1919 


521,500 


612 


319,276 


$157,340 


$49.30 


1920 


621,900 


681 


423,703 


88,271 


20.80 


1921 


414,900 


594 


246,540 


60,402 


24.50 


1922 


444,000 


611 


271,170 


74,572 


27.50 


1923 


544,300 


728 


396,354 


81,998 


20.70 


1924 


473,500 


585 


276,819 


62,597- 


22.60 


1925 


536,200 


696 


373,352 


83,756 


22.40 


1926 


546,700 


692 


378,274 


96,762 


25.60 


1927 


639,600 


755 


482,982 


100,414 


20.80 


1928 


712,400 


692 


493,132 


93,450 


19.00 


1929 


729,300 


665 


484,630 


89,470 


18.50 


1930 


768,000 


757 


581,200 


74,733 


12.90 


1931 


688,500 


692 


476,382 


42,024 


8.80 


1932 


462,500 


624^ 


288,750 


34,949 


12.10 


1933 


667,800 


794 


530,133 


85,530 


16.10 


1934 


486,500 


847 ■ 


412,055 


117,999 


28.60 


19,35 


612,500 


635 


572,625 


116,418 


20.30 


1936 


591,000 


765 


451,975 


101,856 


22.50 


1937 


675,000 


883 


595,815 


143,058 


24.00 


1938 


603,500 


844 


509,470 


115,428 


22.70 


1939 


843,000 


964 


812,540 


123,893 


15.20 


1940 


498,000 


1,038 


516,835 


85,792 


16.60 


1941 


488,000 


928 


452,825 


132,291 


29.20 


1942 


539,000 


1,052 


566,810 


221,538 


39.10 


1943 


580,000 


935 


542,200 


219,074 


40.40 


1944 


684,000 


1.077 


736,990 


317,628 


43.10 


1945 


722,000 


1.100 


794,310 


349,148 


44.00 


1946 


802,000 


1.138 


912,970 


451,639 


49.50 


1947 


783,000 


1,139 


892,205 


374,513 


42.00 


1948 


594,000 


1,239 


739,380 


368,040 


49.80 


1949 


621,000 


1,178 


731,530 


352,685 


48.20 


1950 


640,000 


1,341 


858,140 


477,508 


55.60 


1951 


735,000 


1,331 


978,375 


523,358 


53.50 


1952 


735,000 


1.222 


898,090 


448,582 


49.90 


1953 


674,000 


1,235 


832,305 


447,076 


53.70 


1954 


686,000 


1,204 


889,490 


483,003 


54.30 


1955 


653,000 


1.499 


978,775 


520,845 


53.20 


1956 


579,000 


1.661 


961,495 


496,324 


51.60 


1957 


443,000 


1.469 


650,780 


358,442 


55.10 


1958 


429,000 


1.718 


736,855 


427,307 


58.00 


1959 


458,500 


1.533 


702,942 


407,055 


57.90 


I960** 


458,500 


1.820 


834,600 


510,534 


61.20 



*Source: N. C. and TJSDA Crop Reportinjj 
^Preliminary for 1960. 



20 



North Carolina Burley Crops 
1928-1960* 



Year 


No. Acres 


Yield Per 

Acre 
(PouiuLs) 


Production 
(1,000 lbs.) 


Value 
(1,000 Dollars) 


Average 
Price 


192S 


3,600 


650 


2,340 


$ 690 


$29.50 


1929 


5,500 


730 


4,015 


863 


21.50 


1930 


7,200 


750 


5,400 


853 


15.80 


1931 


7,100 


710 


5,041 


464 


9.20 


1932 


6,500 


735 


4,778 


726 


15.20 


1933 


9,200 


785 


7,222 


715 


9.90 


1934 


5.500 


870 


4,785 


809 


17.50 


1935 


5.200 


925 


4,810 


1,025 


21.30 


1936 


6,000 


900 


5,400 


2,095 


38.80 


1937 


9,000 


975 


8,775 


1,787 


21.40 


1938 


8,600 


900 


7,740 


1,308 


16.90 


1939 


8,100 


1,070 


8,667 


1,447 


16.70 


1940 


6,500 


1,050 


6,825 


1,242 


18.20 


1941 


6,200 


1,075 


6,665 


2,093 


31.40 


1942 


6,600 


1,150 


7,590 


3,211 


42.30 


1943 


8,500 


1.225 


10,412 


5,102 


49.00 


1944 


12,000 


1,390 


16,680 


8,157 


48.90 


1945 


13,000 


1,500 


19,500 


7,568 


38.30 


1946 


9.800 


1,475 


14,455 


5,999 


41.50 


1947 


9,600 


1,560 


14,976 


6,335 


42.30 


1948 


10,300 


1,680 


17,304 


8,012 


46.30 


1949 


10.800 


1,440 


15,552 


6,750 


43.40 


1950 


10,500 


1,700 


17,850 


9,175 


51.40 


1951 


12,200 


1,750 


21,350 


11,572 


54.20 


1952 


12,000 


1,680 


20,160 


9,818 


48.70 


1953 


11,400 


1,800 


20,520 


11,019 


53.70 


1954 


12,700 


1,920 


24,384 


12.680 


52.00 


1955 


9,800 


1,900 


18,620 


10.651 


57.20 


1956 


9,400 


1,850 


17,390 


10.747 


61.80 


1957 


9,600 


1.975 


18,960 


11,073 


58.40 


1958 


9,300 


2,000 


18,600 


11,978 


64.40 


1959 


9,800 


2,060 


20,188 


11,426 


56.60 


I960** 


9,600 


2,050 


19,680 


12,595 


64.00 


*Soiirce: N. C. ;ind USDA 
**Preliminary for 1960. 


Crop Repoiting 


Service. 







21 



N. C. Flue-Cured Tobacco Allotments* 

1961 

Acreage 
County No. Farms Allotmeyit Rank 

Alamance -. 

Alexander 

Anson _._ 

Beaufort 

Bertie - 

Bladen 

Brunswick _ - 

Burke 

Cabarrus 

Caldwell 

Camden 

Carteret 

Caswell 

Catawba ..— 

Chatham 

Chowan 

Cleveland — _ 

Columbus - 

Craven 

Cumberland .- 

Dare 

Davidson 

Davie 

Duplin - 

Durham , 

Edgecombe 

Forsyth — 

Franklin 

Gaston — 

Gates 

Granville 

Greene : 

Guilford 

Halifax .. ^ - 

Harnett ,... 

Hertford -. 

Hoke -- 

Iredell 

Johnston 

Jones 

Lee 

Lenoir 

Martin 

22 



1,433 


4,699.99 


37 


968 


1,391.13 


50 


273 


394.09 


61 


2.455 


9,518.82 


21 


1,755 


5,654.21 


32 


3,312 


7,418.81 


28 


1,765 


3,289.20 


41 


1 


0.58 


69 


1 


0.03 


73 


260 


477.74 


59 


2 


4.66 


66 


417 


1,341.12 


51 


1,948 


9,139.85 


23 


4 


5.30 


65 


1,100 


2,951.34 


46 


194 


545.09 


58 


1 


0.35 


71 


5,065 


16,405.31 


7 


1,820 


8,494.43 


24 


2,427 


5,261.03 


34 


1 


0.07 


72 


1,853 


3,266.79 


44 


814 


1,172.84 


53 


4,455 


15,461.91 


8 


1,022 


3,818.72 


39 


1,610 


11,469.83 


16 


2,279 


4,925.93 


35 


2,754 


11,385.71 


18 


1 


4.59 


67 


127 


268.72 


62 


2,131 


13,277.61 


13 


1,248 


11,926.66 


15 


3,235 


9,154.53 


22 


2,206 


5,875.73 


31 


3,706 


14,409.24 


11 


993 


3,251.14 


45 


861 


2,551.05 


47 


820 


1,221.88 


52 


5,452 


22,666.78 


2 


925 


5,403.30 


33 


1,321 


4,104.32 


38 


1,885 


13,886.08 


12 


1,561 


8,462.40 


25 



N. C. Flue-Cured Tobacco Allotments* 
1961 (continued) 

Acreage 

County No. Farms Allotment Rank 

Mecklenburg 1 0.50 70 

Montgomery __ 424 963.43 56 

Moore -- 1,650 4,877.00 36 

Nash -. 2,974 18,058.58 5 

New Hanover 89 216.15 63 

Northampton 221 471.37 60 

Onslow . 1,889 6,219.43 29 

Orange 950 3,312.80 40 

Pamlico 418 1,095.38 55 

Pender 1,686 3,270.08 43 

Person 1,753 9,603.93 20 

Pitt 2,685 25,180.65 1 

Randolph 1,622 3,288.28 42 

Richmond 1,011 2,085.49 48 

Robeson _ 4,839 20,612.74 3 

Rockingham 3,030 13,004.73 14 

Rowan .-.. 38 46.58 64 

Sampson o,355 15,209.91 9 

Scotland 542 1,152.15 54 

Stokes 2,755 11,412.13 17 

Surry 3,169 10.895.24 19 

Tyrrell 2 1.90 68 

Vance 1,490 8,133.02 26 

Wake S.846 19,308.23 4 

Warren 1,965 6,084.14 30 

Washington 295 957.03 57 

Wayne ' 3,064 14,502.93 10 

W^ilkes 967 1,542.49 49 

Wilson 2,118 16,751.68 6 

Yadkin 2,687 8,028.72 27 



State Total ..119,996 471,245.60 

*Source : USDA Agriculture Stabilization and Conservation.' 



23 



N. C. Burley Tobacco Allotments' 

1961 



Comity No. Farms 

Alleghany 499 

Ashe 2,451 

Avery .._,._ _ _.._- _._... 243 

Brunswick ._. 1 

Buncombe 3,065 

Burke 11 

Caldwell 24 

Catawba __.. 4 

Cherokee — 185 

Clay - - 199 

Cleveland -.- 9 

Davidson 3 

Gaston 1 

Graham 715 

Granville 1 

Haywood 2,040 

Henderson 118 

Iredell -— — - 4 

Jackson 315 

Lincoln _ 2 

McDowell - 85 

Macon 228 

Madison .__. 2,970 

Mitchell 948 

Polk 6 

Randolph ^ - 1 

Rutherford 66 

Stokes 2 

Surry _ 8 

Swain 225 

Transylvania — 70 

Watauga ___ 1,619 

Wilkes - -- 24 

Yadkin 1 

Yancey 1,879 

State Total ._. -... 18,022 

*Source : USDA Agriculture Stabilization and Conservation. 



Acreage 
Allotment 



Rank 



234.14 


9 


1,185.68 


5 


120.73 


11 


0.11 


35 


1,748.17 


2 


4.56 


21 


10.56 


20 


1.48 


26 


69.69 


15 


87.54 


12 


3.07 


23 


1.45 


27 


0.71 


29 


365.81 


8 


0.11 


34 


1,212.44 


3 


49.23 


16 


1.80 


24 


129.28 


10 


0.32 


32 


29.01 


19 


74.86 


14 


2,729.22 


1 


548.50 


i 


1.59 


25 


0.64 


30 


32.01 


18 


0.32 


32. 


0.95 


28 


75.28 


13 


34.61 


17 


852.54 


6 


3.92 


22 


0.11 


33 


1,211.92 


4 


10,822.36 


1-35 



24 



North Carolina Tobacco Warehouses 
and Operators By Belts and Markets 



N, C. BORDER BELT 

Cliadbourn (one set buyers) 

Producers — A. E. & Jack Garrett 
Meyers — J. H. Harper, J. D. Hendley 
Green-Teachey — Charlie Teachey, J. C. Green 

Clarkton (one set buyers) 

Bright Leaf— J. H. Bryant, B. F. Rivenbark, H. G. Perry 
New Clarkton Whse. — Talley Bros. & Sons 

Fair Bluff (one set buyers) 

Powell— A. H. Powell & Sons 

Planters — Carl Meares, Ray Haney 

Littleton's No. 1 & 2—0. P. Littleton. Bill Carter 

Fairmont (4 sets buyers) 

People's Big 5 — E. J. Chambers, Yarboro & Garrett Co. 

Davis & Mitchell Davis — F. A. Davis, Harry & Jack Mitchell 

Holliday-Frye— E. H. Frye, J. W. and J. M. Holliday 

Planters No. 1 & 2— G. R. Royster, Daniel 

Square Deal 1-2-3— W .G. Bassett 

Star Carolina 1-2-3— W. M. Puckett 

Liberty-Twin State— P. R. Floyd, Jr., Paul Wilson, F. P. Joyce, Joe Pell 

Fayetteville (one set buyers) 

Big Farmers 1 & 2 — P. L. Campbell 
Planters — J. W. Stephenson, J. C. Adams 

Lumberton (three sets buyers) 

Carolina — M. A. Roycroft, J. L. Townsend, J. Johnson 
Smith-Dixie — Furman Biggs, Sr. & Jr. 
Hedgepeth — R. A. Hedgepeth, R. L. Rollins 
Liberty — R. E. Wilkens, R. H. Livermore 
Star, Inc. — Hogan Teater, D. T. Stephenson 
Lumberton Cooperative — C. E. McLaurin, Mgr. 

Tabor City (one set buyers) 

Carolina — R. C. Coleman, Mrs. Harriet Sikes 
New Farmers — R. C. Coleman, Mrs. Harriet Sikes 
Planters — Don Watson, Mgr. 

AMiiteville (three sets buyers) 

Crutchfield— G. E. & R. W. Crutchfield 

Lea's Big Dixie — William Townes Lea, Louie Love, Jimmy Morgan 

25 



Moore's — A. H. Moore, C. C. Mason, C. F. Jeff coat 
Nelson's No. 1 & 2 — John H. Nelson 
Planters No. 1 & 2— A. O. King, Jr., J. W. Peay 
Gray-Neal Farmers-Columbus County — A. Dial Gray, J. L. Neal 
• Carolina — Lucieu Stephens, A. W. Williamson. Ernest Smith 
Liberty — J. W. Hooks, I. A. Barefoot & Sons 
Smith — Ernest Smith, Gary Bryan 

EASTERN BEI.T 

Ahoskic (one set buyers) 

Basnight No. 1-2-3— L. L. Wilkens, H. G. Veazey 
Farmers No. 1 & 2 — W. M. Odom, Pierce & Winborne 

Clinton (one set buyers) 

Carolina — L. D. Herring, C. J. Strickland 

Ross No. 2 — Guy R. Ross 

Farmers — H. A. Carr, J. A. Chestnut, J. J. Hill 

Dunn (one set buyers) 

Big 4 Warehouse — Tom Smothers, Jack Calhoun 
Planters — King Roberts, J. M. Smothers 

Farmville (two sets buyers) 
Bell's— Bill Brothers 

Farmers «&: Monk's No. 1 & 2 — John N. Fountain, Mgr. 
Planters & Prewits — Chester Worthington, W. A. Newell, B. S. Correll & 

C. Prewitt 
Lee's — Gordon Lee, Carl Rowan 

Goldsboro (one set buyers) 

Carolina — S. G. Best, Bruce Smith 

Farmers No. 1— S. B. Hill, Carl Holloman, J. F. Hill 

Farmers No. 2— S. B. Hill, Carl Holloman, J. F. Hill 

Big Brick — J. R. Musgrave 

Victory — Richard Gray, Clarence Whitley 

Greenville (five sets buyers) 

Cannon's — W. T. Cannon, Carlton Bail 

Farmers — J. A. Tripp 

Star-Planters— Harding Suggs, B. B. Suggs, J. T. Hill 

McGowan's — J. A. Worthington, Jack Moye 

New Carolina No. 1 & 2 — Lee Paramore, Laddie Avery 

New Independent — Bob Cullipher, F. L. Blount 

Victory — Harold Forbes, G. B. Jones 

Raynor-Forbes — Noah Raynor, A. H. Forbes 

Keel's — Ashley Wynne, Floyd McGowan 

Harris & Rogers — R. E. Rogers 

Kinston (four sets buyers) 
Central — W. I. Herring- 
Farmers — J. T. Jenkins 

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Kiustoii Cooperative — S. W. Smith 
Knott Warehouse, Inc. — K. W. Loftin, Mgr. 
Knott's New~H. G. Knott, W. E. Brewer 
New Dixie — John Jenkins, Mgr. 
Sheppard No. 1 & 2— J. T. Sheppard 
New Central — W. I. Herring, Bill King 
The Star Warehouse No. 1 — C. J. Herring 
The Star Warehouse No. 2 — C. J. Herring 
Banner — K. W. Loftin, Mgr. 

Koborsoiiville (one set buyers) 

Adkins & Bailey — I. M. Little, R. K. Adkins 

Gray & Gray- (Red Front)— J. H. Gray, J. W. Peay 

Planters No. 1 & 2— H. T. Highsmith, E. G. Anderson 

Kooky Mount (four sets ))uyers) 

Cobb & Carlton No. 1 & 2— W. E. Cobb, J. C. Carlton 

Mangum — Roy M. Phipps 

Planters No. 1-2-3— W. B. Faulkner, Mgr. 

Smith No. 1 & 2— James D. Smith 

Works Warehouse — R. J. Works & Son 

Easley Warehouse Co., Inc. — H. A. Easley, Mgr. 

Farmers Warehouse, Inc. — J. C. Holt Evans, Mgr. 

Fenners — J. B. Fenner 

Sniithfleld (two sets buyers) 

Big Planters — J. B. Wooten, Mrs. W. A. Carter 

Farmers No. 1 & 2 — Joe & C. E. Stephenson 

Gold Leaf No. 1 & 2— R. A. Pearce 

Perkins Riverside — N. L. Perkins 

Wallace No. 1 & 2 — Lawrence and Dixon Wallace 

Skinner's — Frank Skinner 

Tarboro (one set buyers) 

Clark's No. 1 & 2— H. I. Johnson, S. A. McConkey 
Farmers No. 1 & 2— W. L. House, J. P. Bunn 
Victory No. 1 & 2— Cliff Weeks, W. L. Leggett 

Wallace (one set buyers) 

Blanchard & Farrior — O. C. Blanchard, W. H. Farrior 
Hussey No. 1 & 3 — Joe Bryant, Bill Hussey 
Sheffield's— John Sheffield 

Washington (one set buyers) 

Sermons No. 1 & 2 — W. J. Sermons, J. E. Roberson 
Talley-Hassell 1 & 2— M. M. Hassell, W. G. Talley 

Wendell (one set buyers) 

Farmers — L. R. Clark & Son 

Liberty 1 & 2— H. F. Harris, I. D. Medlin, J. W. Dale 

Northside — G. Dean 



27 



Wilson (five sets buyers) 

Big Dixie— E. B. Hicks, W. C. Thompson 

Wainwrigtit — G. L. Wainwright 

Center Brick No. 1-2-3— Cozart & Eagles Co. 

Farmers — J. J. Gibbons, S. G. Deans 

Growers Cooperative — S. E. Griffin, Mgr. 

New Planters No. 1 & 2— R. T. & W. C. Smith, B. W. Carr 

Smith Warehouse, Inc.^ — H. H. Harris, Jr., Mgr. 

Watson — U. H. Cozart, Jr., Pres. 

Clark's— C. R. & Boyd Clark 

New Liberty — Carl B. Renfro 

Willianiston (one set buyers) 

Farmers — John A. Griffin, Leman Barnhill 
Rodgers Warehouse — Urbin Rogers, Russell Rogers 
Planters & Roanoke-Dixie — Jim Pierce, Fisher Harris 

Windsor (one set buyers) 

Planters 1 & 2— C. B. & B. U. Griffin, J. D. & Charles Marshall 
Heckstall — Max Hux, Julian Hexstall 

MIDDLE BELT 

Aberdeen (one set buyers) 

New Aberdeen — George Mabe, Tom Faulkner 
Planters — W. Fentriss Phillips 
Hardee's — Hugh T. Hardee 

Carthage (one set buyers) 

McConnells — G. Hoover Carter 
Victory — B. T. Bailey & Earl Ennis 

Durham (three sets buyers) 

Liberty — John Walker Stone 

Roycroft— H. T., M. A. & J. K. Roycroft, J. C. Currin 

Star-Brick^ — A. L. Carver, Cozart, Currin 

Farmers — J. M. Talley, Howard Talley, Bob Dale, Sam Mangum 

Ellerbe (one set buyers) 

Farmers — R. P. Brim & S. H. Richardson 
Richmond County — Bud Rummage & Roy Smith 

Fuqiiay-Varina (two sets buyers) 

Big Top— Bill Talley & E. E. Clayton 
New Deal— W. M., A. R., A. L. Talley 
Southside — J. C. Adams, J. W. Stephenson 
Goldleaf— Sherrill Akins & J. W. Dail 
Liberty — P. L. Campbell 

Henderson (two sets buyers) 

Banners— E. C. Huff, L. R. Wilkinson 

Carolina — M. L. High 

Moore's Big Henderson — A. H. Moore 

28 



1 



Farmers — W. J. Alston, Jr. 
High Price — C. J. Fleming, C. B. Turner 
Liberty — George T. Robertson 
Ellington— F. H. Ellington & Sons 

Loiiisbiirg (one set buyers) 

Big Franklin— A. N. Wilson, S. T. & H. B. Cottrell 

Southside A & B— Charlie Ford 

Friendly Four — L. L. Sturdivant, James Speed 

Oxford (two sets buyers) 

Banner — W. L. Mitchell, Jr., David Mitchell 

Mangum-Farmers — T. B. Williams, Julian Adcock, S. B. Knott 

Fleming No. 1 & 2— G. B. Watkins, D. T. Currin 

Planters & Johnson — C. R. Watkins, C. R. Watkins, Jr. 

Owens No. 1 & 2 — J. S. Watkins, L. Gregory 

Granville — L. S. Bryan, Jr., W. W. Yeargin 

Sanford (one set buyers) 

Wood 3-W No. 1 & 2— W. F. Wood 
Twin City 1 & 2— W. M. Carter, T. V. Mansfield 
King Roberts 1-2-3 — King Roberts 
Castleberrys — C. N. Castleberry 

AVari-entou (one set buyers) 
Boyd's— W. P. Burwell 
Center No. 1 & 2— M. D. Carroll 
Farmers — E. G. Tarwater 
Thompson — C. E. Thompson 
Currin's No. 1 & 2— D. G. Currin & C. W. Currin 



OLD BELT 

Burlington (one set buyers) 

Carolina — Joe Dillard, Jule Allen 

Coble — N. C. Newman, L. O. Winstead, R. W. Rainey 

Farmers — Bill & Jack McCauley 

Greensboro (one set buyers) 

Greensboro Tobacco Warehouse Co. — R. C. Coleman, Mgr. 
Guilford County Whse. Co.— H. P. Smothers, W. B. Hull 

Madison (one set buyers) 

New Brick— R. T. Chiltou, S. F. Webster 
Carolina — R. T. Chilton, S. F. Webster 
Sharpe & Smith — W. S. Smith, H. A. Fagg 
Farmers— W. S. Smith, H. A. Fagg 

Mebane (one set buyers) 

Growers 1 & 2 — Roy Smith & Bud Rummage 

New Piedmont — A. O. King, Jr., Billy Hopkins, Hugh Strayhorn 



29 



Mt. Airy (one set buyers) 

Dixie 1 & 2— J. W. & J. L. Hunter 

Liberty — F. V. Dearmin, Tom Jones, Buck White, 0. L. Badgett 
Jones — Tom Jones, Buck White, O. L. Badgett, F. V. Dearmin 
Hunters — J. W., J. L. Hunter 

Reidsville (one set buyers) 

Farmers-Brown— G. E. Smith, P. D. McMichael, D. Huffines 
Leader-Watts — A. P. Sands, A. G. Irvin, J. L. Pennix 
Smothers— T. B. & J. M. Smothers 

Koxboro (one set buyers) 

Farmers — Lindsay Wagstaff, R. L. Hester 
Hyco — W. R. Jones, F. J. Hester, Geo. Walker 
Foacre — H. W. Winstead, Jr., Pres. 
Planters No. 2 — T. O. Pass 
Winstead— T. T. & Elmo Mitchell 
Pioneer— J. H. Merritt, D. L. Whitfield 

Stonevillc (one set buyers) 

Joyce's No. 1 & 2 — O. P. Joyce, Willis Wake 
Farmers — F. A. Brown, P. M. Moorefield 
Piedmont — J. J. Webster 
Powell — Elmer Powell, Joe R. Sharpe 

Winston-Salem (four sets buyers) 

Brown — R. W. Newsome, W. B. Simpson 
Carolina-Star — G. H. Robertson, H. M. Bouldin 
Growers — Floyd Joyce, W. G. Sheets, J. R. Pell, M. M. Joyner 
Pepper No. 1 & 2 — Fred Owens, F. L. Kellam 
Planters — Foss Smithdeal, Frank Smithdeal, Wes Watson 
Taylor — Paul Taylor 
Big Winston— R. T. & J. F. Carter 

Cooks No. 1 & 2— B. E. Cook, C. B. Strickland, William Fowler, H. A. 
Thomas 

N. C. BURLEY BELT 

Asheville (two sets buyers — second set incomplete) 
Burley-Dixie No. 1 & 2— L. J. Hill 
Planters No. 1 & 2— J. W. Stewart 
Bernard-Walker Warehouse — James E. Walker, Mgr. 
Day's — Charlie Day 

Boone (one set buyers) 

Mountain Burley No. 1 & 2 — Joe E. Coleman 
Farmers Burley — Joe E. Coleman 

West Jefferson (one set buyers) 

Tri-State Burley— C. C. Taylor, Rex Taylor 
Jarrell's — Bill Jarrell 

30 



DOMESTIC CIGARETTE CONSUMPTION 
BY KINDS- 1960 




Total Domestic Consumption 
480 Billion Cigarettes